Society for the Promotion of the Egyptian Museum Berlin

Frühe Handwerkskunst

Gefäß mit Tierdarstellungen
ÄM 23222; Keramik; Negade-II-Zeit, um 3700 – 3200 v. Chr.; Höhe: 26 cm

Gefäß mit Tierdarstellungen
Gefäß mit Tierdarstellungen
Gefäß mit Tierdarstellungen

Im Dienste des Königs

Schreiberfigur des Domänenverwalters Dersenedj, ÄM 15701; Granit; Altes Reich,
5. Dynastie, um 2450 v. Chr.; Höhe: 68 cm

Schreiberfigur des Domänenverwalters Dersenedj
Schreiberfigur des Domänenverwalters Dersenedj
Schreiberfigur des Domänenverwalters Dersenedj

Lebensader Nil

Relief aus dem Sonnenheiligtum des Königs Ni-user-Rê, ÄM 20036; Kalkstein bemalt; Altes Reich, 5. Dynastie, um 2375 v. Chr.; Höhe 56 cm, Breite 86 cm

Relief aus dem Sonnenheiligtum des Königs Ni-user-Rê
Relief aus dem Sonnenheiligtum des Königs Ni-user-Rê
Relief aus dem Sonnenheiligtum des Königs Ni-user-Rê

Familienidylle

Hausaltar aus Amarna, ÄM 14145; Kalkstein; Neues Reich, 18. Dynastie, um 1345 v. Chr.; Höhe 32,5 cm

Hausaltar aus Amarna
Hausaltar aus Amarna
Hausaltar aus Amarna

Nubisches Gold

Schildring mit Widderkopf aus dem Grabschatz der Amanishakheto
ÄM 22871; Gold mit Glasflüssen; 1. Jh. v. Chr.; Höhe: 4,5 cm

Schildring mit Widderkopf
Schildring mit Widderkopf
Schildring mit Widderkopf

Special hints

 

The museum

The Egyptian Museum and Papyrus collection of Berlin worldwide renown not only for the bust of Nefertiti, the portrait of Tiy and the 'Berlin Green Head' presents art and papyri from over 5000 years discovered in Egypt and the Sudan. Most objects were offerings found in graves, some few were found in temples.

The paintings and reliefs, especially of the three unique offering chambers, convey an impression of the ancient environment and daily life. The sculptures of pharaohs and high officials, the decorated coffins and books of the death, the literary and economic texts as well as the private letters presented in the 'library of ancient Egypt', complement our view of Egypt. The religious believes become visible through statues of gods, votive steles and cult equipment.

Events

Current exhibitions

  • Berlin / Germany

    ONE GOD - Abraham's Legacy on the Nile. Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Egypt from Antiquity until the Middle Ages

    02.04.2015 – 31.12.2016
    In Egypt, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam share a very long common history. 'ONE GOD - Abraham's Legacy on the Nile' takes a closer look at the religious life and day-to-day coexistence of the three faith communities in Egypt, from the time of the Romans all the way up to the Fatimid caliphate in the 12th century. The exhibition shows that much can be learned from archaeological finds that reflect the largely peaceful coexistence of the world religions over the course of many centuries, especially when viewed in today's political climate.

    On show are over 250 objects from Egypt's rich cultural heritage. Many come from the collections of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin and Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin and have never gone on show before. The Berlin objects are enriched in number by outstanding pieces from the British Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum, the Louvre, the Cambridge University Library and other collections.

    The exhibition takes its name from Abraham, the original father and archetype for monotheistic faith and a powerful common thread linking Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Also presented in the exhibition are other figures that appear across all three religions, such as Moses, Daniel, Joseph, or the Archangel Gabriel, who were popular figures in Egypt. Based on evidence found in Egypt of the holy scriptures of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, visitors are given a brief introduction to the essential characteristics of the three world religions. The display also reveals the different types of sacred buildings - synagogue, church, and mosque - and explains their architectural history and dissemination in Egypt.

    The exhibition is not exclusively about religion; it also traces the everyday life of people in Egypt over hundreds of years. Objects on view reflect daily life, starting with birth, childhood, and school. In popular belief, magic also played an important role in all three religious communities. The exhibition ends with the funeral rites and concepts of the afterlife among Jews, Christians, and Muslims.

Overview

You are using CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/)your browser type cannot be determined | Text version  | About accessibility | Produced by: RexPublica
Bitte beachten Sie die Hinweise zur Webanalyse